Speakers

The following is the Speaker list for Metaverse U 1.0 (held in 2008)

Jeremy Bailenson
Jeremy Bailenson

Jeremy Bailenson earned a B.A. cum laude from the University of Michigan in 1994 and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Northwestern University in 1999. After receiving his doctorate, he spent four years at the Research Center for Virtual Environments and Behavior at the University of California, Santa Barbara as a Post-Doctoral Fellow and then an Assistant Research Professor. He currently is the director of Stanford's Virtual Human Interaction Lab.

Bailenson's main area of interest is the phenomenon of digital human representation, especially in the context of immersive virtual reality. He explores the manner in which people are able to represent themselves when the physical constraints of body and veridically-rendered behaviors are removed. Furthermore, he designs and studies collaborative virtual reality systems that allow physically remote individuals to meet in virtual space, and explores the manner in which these systems change the nature of verbal and nonverbal interaction.

His work has been published in several academic journals, including Cognitive Psychology, Discourse Processes, Human Communication Research, Psychological Science, and PRESENCE: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, and his research is funded by the National Science Foundation, Stanford University, and by various Silicon Valley and international corporations.

Jon Brouchoud
Jon Brouchoud

Jon Brouchoud (Keystone Bouchard in Second Life) is an evangelist for virtual architecture, freelance designer and consultant focusing on the convergence of architecture, virtual worlds and augmented reality. He has collaborated on a wide range of Second Life projects and events, including the virtual U.S. House of Representatives, Autodesk Island, TED Island, as well as his own Gallery of Reflexive Architecture. He is author of 'The Arch' blog , founder of Architecture Islands, an incubator for architects and designers in virtual worlds, and also leads the Architecture in Secondcommunity group.

He co-founded Studio Wikitecture, a Web 2.0 and virtual reality project aimed at applying an open source paradigm to the design and production of architecture and urban planning. In much the same way Wikipedia enables a loose, self-organizing network of contributors to collaborate on content creation, Studio Wikitecture has been experimenting with ways to bring together a diverse and geographically disperse community of individuals to create an architecturally noteworthy design that, in the end, is more than the sum of its parts.

Jon and his wife Kandy operate Crescendo Design, a studio specialized in developing sustainable design concepts. Their 'Nutrihouse' design was chosen for construction in the Cradle-to-Cradle Home competition and they won 3rd place for their entry in the Tuscon Gateway International Design Competition.

Jon has a Master of Architecture degree from the School of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. His full CV can be found here, and he can be reached at jbrouchoud@gmail.com

Beth Coleman

Dr. Beth Coleman is a professor in Writing and Humanistic Studies and Comparative Media Studies at MIT. Her research interests include virtual world design and use, networked subjectivity, global media emergence and practice in China, India and Africa, and contemporary art and technology. For excerpts from her forthcoming book, Hello Avatar: A Virtual World Primer, see her website <cms.mit.edu/people/bcoleman>. She blogs on emergent media practices at projectgoodluck.com.

Parvati Dev
Parvati Dev

Parvati Dev completed her doctoral degree in Electrical Engineering on computer models of the brain at Stanford University. She has worked on the research and teaching staff at M.I.T., Boston University, and Stanford. From 1982 to 1989 she was Vice-President at CEMAX Inc, where she developed products for three-dimensional imaging of patients from computed tomography and magnetic resonance scans. From 1990 to 2007, she led the SUMMIT research laboratory for learning technologies at Stanford, a pioneer in the development of digital educational materials related to anatomy and surgery. Between 2002 and 2004, she was appointed Associate Dean of Learning Technologies for the medical school.  Dr. Dev's research includes virtual world and game-based learning, collaborative learning over Internet2, the simulation of clinical procedures, and the evaluation of learning outcomes.  She now leads a new company, Innovation in Learning, Inc., to further develop new online learning environments.

 

Daniel Huebner

Daniel Huebner has spent the best years of his life attempting to bring chaos to otherwise orderly systems — toiling as a journalist, analyst, and editor with Game Developer Magazine and Gamasutra.com; lecturing at E3, the Game Developers Conference, Artfutra, and the Veerstichting Symposium; redeveloping the International Game Developers Association; and, most recently, creating new flavors of community as Second Life’s director of Community Affairs. He currently earns his keep as a consultant and writer searching for the next greatest thing.

 

Wagner James Au
Wagner James Au

Wagner James Au is the author of *The Making of Second Life* (HarperCollins), based on his five years writing about the user-created world as its first "embedded journalist", which he continues covering on his blog New World Notes (nwn.blogs.com).
He also writes about online games and virtual worlds for GigaOM.com (gigaom.com/author/wjamesau/).

Brewster Kahle
Brewster Kahle

Brewster Kahle, digital librarian and director and co-founder of the Internet Archive, has been working to provide universal access to all human knowledge for more than fifteen years. Since the mid-1980s, Kahle has focused on developing transformational technologies for information discovery and digital libraries. In 1989 Kahle invented the Internet?s first publishing system, WAIS (Wide Area Information Server) and in 1989, founded WAIS Inc., a pioneering electronic publishing company that was sold to America Online in 1995. In 1996, Kahle founded the Internet Archive, the largest publicly accessible, privately funded digital archive in the world. At the same time, he co-founded Alexa Internet in April 1996, which was sold to Amazon.com in 1999. Alexa's services are bundled into more than 80% of Web browsers. Kahle earned a bachelor's degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1982. As a student, he studied artificial intelligence with Marvin Minsky and W. Daniel Hillis. In 1983, Kahle helped start Thinking Machines, a parallel supercomputer maker, serving there as lead engineer for six years. He was selected as a member of the Upside 100 in 1997, Micro Times 100 in 1996 and 1997, and Computer Week 100 in 1995.

 

Vladlen Koltun
Vladlen Koltun

Vladlen Koltun is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University and is the founding head of the Stanford Virtual Worlds Group. His prior work in computational geometry and theoretical computer science was recognized with the NSF CAREER Award, the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, and the Machtey Award. He is on the editorial board of Theory of Computing and is editor of two special issues for SIAM Journal on Computing. He regularly serves on program committees of prominent academic conferences in computer science. In spare time he enjoys hurtling through space atop his Ducati, geeking out on electronic music and art flicks, pinning new tacks on the map, twisting himself into a pretzel, and low frequency effects.

 

Raph Koster
Raph Koster

A professional game designer and frequent writer on issues of virtual world design, Raph Koster was the lead designer on the seminal online world ULTIMA ONLINE, which first brought online worlds to the mass market. Until March 2006 he was Chief Creative Officer for Sony Online Entertainment, makers of EVERQUEST, where he previously led the design of STAR WARS GALAXIES. His essays and writings on online world design include widely reprinted and influential pieces such as "Declaring the Rights of Players", "The Laws of Online World Design", and "A Story About a Tree". He is in demand as a speaker and lecturer on issues of online world design, particularly in the area of community building. He is a regular speaker at the Game Developers Conference, and is the maintainer of the canonical history of virtual worlds at his website, http://www.raphkoster.com. His book A THEORY OF FUN FOR GAME DESIGN was published in 2004 by Paraglyph Press and is used in several university courses as study material.

 

Kari Kraus
Kari Kraus

Kari Kraus's research and teaching interests focus on new media and the digital humanities, digital preservation, intellectual property, image search and retrieval technologies, and textual scholarship and print culture. Before completing her doctorate in English at the University of Rochester in 2006, Kraus served as project assistant and later project consultant to the William Blake Archive, an online archive sponsored by the Library of Congress and supported by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 2006-2007 she was technology evangelist for Zotero, an open-source research tool for the Firefox web browser, produced by the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. This fall she joined the College of Information Studies and the Department of English at the University of Maryland as an assistant professor. Kraus is a local Co-PI on a Library of Congress NDIIPP grant for preserving virtual worlds, including the multi-user virtual environment Second Life, and a founding member of the editorial board for MediaCommons, a digital scholarly network under development with support from the Institute for the Future of the Book (part of the Annenberg Center for Communication at USC) and the MacArthur Foundation. She has taught at the University of Rochester and the Eastman School of Music, and in the Art and Visual Technology program at George Mason University.

 

Wm. LeRoy Heinrichs
Wm. LeRoy Heinrichs

Dr. Heinrichs, Professor (Emeritus) and Past Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Stanford University, early recognized the value of teaching laparoscopic surgery with VR systems. At SUMMIT, he developed the first digital human female pelvis, an anatomically-correct, 3D model.  In 2002, the Lucy 2.0 website won a Pirelli INTERNETional Award, and the MMVR organization honored his leadership in simulation-based training with the 8th Annual Satava Award. He is PI on Wallenberg Foundation projects, and Medical Advisor to Forterra Systems, Inc., with which he and colleagues are developing MMOS for medical training. Dr. Heinrichs writes and lectures widely on Surgical Simulation and Online Training of Medical Teams. http://summit.stanford.edu

 

Mike Liebhold
Mike Liebhold

Mike Liebhold is a Senior Researcher for the Institute for the Future, IFTF, focusing on the mobile and abundant computation, immersive media and geospatial web foundations for context-aware and ubiquitous computing. Previously, Mike was a Visiting Researcher, Intel Labs, Working on a pattern language based on semantic web frameworks for ubiquitous computing. Before that, During the late 1990s Mike worked on startups building large scale international public IT services and IP networks for rural and remote regions, and for GPS enhanced precision agriculture, a complete IT architecture for schools in Shandong Province China, satellite networks in India, Europe, and Latin America, and was the Principal Investigator for a National Science Foundation project to bring Internet2 broadband IP networks to seventy rural low income communities in the US.
During the mid 90's, Mike was a senior services Architect at Netscape Communications and a founding member of Netscape's Strategic Investors board. Previously, Mike was Vice President, Chief Technology Officer for Times Mirror Publishing, where he lead launch of dozens of early websites, and many large scale IT programs.For ten years prior, Mr. Liebhold was Senior Scientist, for Apple Computer, researching and developing media technologies, geospatial information systems, high speed communications. Mike lead research on the first digital video programs at Apple eventually released as Quicktime. At Apple Computers', Advanced Technology Labs, Mike lead the Terraform project--an investigation of cartographic and location-based hypermedia and the launch of strategic partnerships with the National Geographic, Lucasfilm, Disney and other major media companies.

 

Henry Lowood
Henry Lowood

Henry is curator for history of science & technology collections and Film & Media collections in the Stanford University Libraries. He is also a lecturer in the Science and Technology Studies Program, the History and Philosophy of Science Program, and the Film & Media Studies Program. He is principal investigator of How They Got Game: The History of Interactive Simulations and Videogames, a research project funded by the Stanford Humanities Laboratory (SHL), as well as co-director of SHL. He offers Stanford students a popular course on the history of computer game design and last year offered a seminar on the "Consumer as Creator in Contemporary Media" that included critical takes on the development of machinima.

 

Rebecca Moore
Rebecca Moore

Rebecca Moore is a computer scientist and longtime software professional. At Google, she started and now manages the Google Earth Outreach program, which supports nonprofits, communities and indigenous peoples around the world in applying Google's mapping tools to the world's pressing problems in areas such as environmental conservation, human rights, cultural preservation and creating a sustainable society. Her personal work using Google Earth was recently instrumental in stopping a plan to log more than a thousand acres of redwoods in her Santa Cruz Mountain community. Rebecca earned her undergraduate degree from Brown University in Artificial Intelligence, Masters from Stanford in Cognitive Psychology and spent several years in the Stanford PhD program in Computer Science before taking leave to join a Silicon Valley startup.

 

Cory Ondrejka
Cory Ondrejka

Cory Ondrejka is the cofounder of Second Life, the hugely successful and award winning virtual world, where he architected the core code and hired the team responsible for Second Life's growth to over 12 million residents. He is currently a visiting professor in the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California. He is an authority on the development and use of virtual worlds in game, entertainment, education, government, military, and business applications. In addition, Ondrejka is an expert on the complex interrelation between innovation and learning, as well as the technological and social requirements of product development across entangled, geographically dispersed teams. Prior to Second Life, Ondrejka led the development of numerous video games, including Road Rash 64. He is a graduate of the United States Naval Academy, where he completed degrees in both Weapons and Systems Engineering and Computer Science.

 

Jerry Paffendorf
Jerry Paffendorf

Jerry Paffendorf is a co-founder and creative director of Wello Horld, a startup turning the World Wide Web into a World Wide World (but, you may ask, isn't the world already definitionally, well, world wide? hmm...). Formerly he was Resident Futurist at the Electric Sheep Company, and a founding conspirator of the Metaverse Roadmap project, a cross-industry conversation about the connected futures of the social web, games, virtual worlds, mirror worlds, augmented reality, and lifelogging. Jerry went to university for art and futures studies. He lives and plays in Brooklyn, NY. His outlook on the 21st century is heavily inspired by acceleration thinkers like Ray Kurzweil and John Smart, and his stated religious views on Facebook are Chaotic Good.

 

Tony Parisi
Tony Parisi

As Chief Platform Officer and a co-founder of Media Machines, Tony is responsible for evolving 3d graphic technology on the Web to something that can easily and simply delight millions. With twenty years as a successful software developer and entrepreneur, Tony pioneered 3D graphics on the Web, first as co-creator of VRML and again as co-chair and editor of the X3D specification, today's ISO standard for networked 3D graphics. Parisi was also founder and CEO of Intervista Software, one of the first Web 3D developers, which he went on to successfully sell to Platinum Technologies in 1998. Early in his career, Tony worked for innovators Lotus Development and BBN.

 

Byron Reeves
Byron Reeves

Byron Reeves, a noted expert on the effects of media, was appointed professor in the Department of Communication at Stanford in 1985 after spending the first 10 years of his academic career in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Professor Reeves has published widely on such topics as children and television, physiological responses to media, attention, memory, and emotion, the history of media effects research, political advertising, television news, and multi-player interactive games. He is co-author of The Media Equation: How People Treat Computers, Television, and the New Media Like Real People and Places (Cambridge University Press).

Professor Reeves is currently Director of the Stanford Center for the Study of Language and Information (CSLI), an interdisciplinary group of faculty working at the intersection of computing and social sciences. He is also co-founder of the Media X Program that brings together industry partners with university researchers across the campus working on innovations in interactive technology. Together with graduate students in the Department of Communication, Professor Reeves is currently studying psychological responses to interactive media. Current projects in his lab include the study of emotional responses to interactive robots, physiological arousal to media and influences on learning, responses to conversational agents in automated telephone and web transactions, and psychological responses in multi-player games.

 

Christian Renaud
Christian Renaud

Christian Renaud is the Chief Architect of Networked Virtual Environments for the Cisco Technology Center. Technology Center acts as ‘intrapreneurs’ for the efforts of Cisco’s Corporate Development organization, providing business rationale and market insight for determining future Cisco emerging technologies. The Technology Center is Cisco’s corporate incubator chartered with identifying emerging markets and technologies and developing them into new revenue streams for the company.

 

Howard Rheingold
Howard Rheingold

Howard Rheingold is the author of:

1. Tools for Thought
2. The Virtual Community
3. Smart Mobs

Was the:

1. editor of Whole Earth Review
2. editor of The Millennium Whole Earth Catalog
3. founding executive editor of Hotwired
4. founder of Electric Minds

Has taught:

1. Digital Journalism
(Stanford University Winter, 2006 )
2. Participatory Media/Collective Action
(UC Berkeley. School of Information, Fall 2006)
3. Toward a Literacy of Cooperation
(Stanford, Winter, 2005)
4. Participatory Media and Collective Action
(UC Berkeley, SIMS, Fall 2005 )

Is:

1. Non-resident Fellow, Annenberg Center for Communication
2. Visiting Professor, De Montfort University, UK

Current Projects:

1. The Cooperation Project
2. Participatory Media Literacy

 

Jeffrey T. Schnapp
Jeffrey T. Schnapp

Jeffrey has been the director of the Stanford Humanities Lab since its foundation in 2000 (co-director since 2005). He occupies the Pierotti Chair in Italian Literature at Stanford University where he is professor of French & Italian, Comparative Literature, and German Studies. The author of ten books and over one hundred essays in four languages, his work has appeared in reviews such as Critical Inquiry, Representations, South Atlantic Quarterly, Journal of Contemporary History, Merkur, Intersezioni, Veredas and Lugar Comum.

 

Reuben Steiger
Reuben Steiger

Reuben Steiger is the CEO of Millions of Us, a company dedicated to helping businesses understand and harness the power of virtual worlds and online communities. Prior to founding Millions of Us, Steiger was the Evangelist for Linden Lab, creators of the 3-D virtual world Second Life. In that role he was responsible for business development efforts and bringing the first wave of corporations and commercial developers into Second Life. Until 2002, he was Chief Development Officer at OVEN Digital, where he helped build that company into the world's largest privately-owned Internet consultancy with 11 offices and 350 employees worldwide. Steiger holds a BA in English Literature from Brown University and lives in Marin County with his wife and two young children.

TL Taylor
TL Taylor

T.L. Taylor is associate professor in the Center for Computer Games Research at the IT University of Copenhagen where she also heads the Multimedia Technology and Games graduate program. As a sociologist, she has been working in the field of internet and multi-user studies for over fifteen years and has published on topics such as values in design, avatars and online embodiment, play and experience in online worlds, gender and gaming, pervasive gaming, and intellectual property in MMOGs. Her current book Play Between Worlds: Exploring Online Game Culture (MIT Press, 2006) uses her multi-year ethnography of EverQuest to explore issues related to play and game culture. For more information visit: http://www.itu.dk/~tltaylor

 

Ginsu Yoon
Ginsu Yoon

Gene Yoon handles a variety of business matters for Linden Lab, including international market development, corporate and business development, and external developer programs. He was also previously the company's general counsel and provided interim leadership for finance. Prior to Linden Lab, he was general counsel and corporate secretary at Airespace, a wireless LAN equipment company, where he negotiated key strategic relationships, including the sale of the company to Cisco Systems. Before joining Airespace, Gene was a principal at KTB Ventures, leading the firm's investments in wireless communications, networking equipment and semiconductors. He worked with the Airespace founders prior to joining KTB, while consulting with portfolio companies of Storm Ventures. He practiced law at Venture Law Group, advising many technology startups and venture capital firms, and at Kirkland & Ellis in New York, where his practice focused on leveraged buyouts and other complex corporate transactions. Gene received an A.B. degree from Princeton University and a J.D. from New York University School of Law.